Email marketing is still one of the most effective means of connecting with your target audience. If you want your readers to respond to your call to action, you need to get them to start reading—and keep reading until they take the action you want them to. One way to accomplish that is to create a soap opera sequence.Soap Opera Technique For Email Marketing

What is a Soap Opera Sequence?

A soap opera sequence is a series of marketing emails that uses drama and suspense to hook readers and convince them to click on the call to action. Each email ends with a cliffhanger that entices readers and makes them eager to read the next installment in the series.

Also known as an SOS, the soap opera sequence consists of five emails that follow a specific formula designed to deliver results. If you do it right, the SOS can be irresistible.

Soap opera sequences work because human beings are naturally inclined to respond to stories. We learn from stories. People who make an emotional investment in a company or product are far more likely to convert than people who don’t—it’s that simple.

The Five Stages of a Soap Opera Sequence 

Now let’s walk through the five emails that make up the soap opera sequence. Within this framework, you can get really creative. For example, you might share a client’s success story or talk about the big epiphany that helped you make your first million dollars.

The first email sets the scene. In it, you should tease the most compelling piece of information you’ll be sharing—something directly connected to your call to action. For example, you might say, “In my next email, I’ll tell you how I pulled my company back from the brink of disaster… with one simple trick.”

In the second email, you should build suspense by introducing drama. Often, companies use the second email to offer some backstory. Continuing with our example, it might say “I had just lost my biggest client and we didn’t have the money to pay our suppliers.”

The third email should explain your epiphany—the thing you realized that helped you to save the day. It might read something like this. “That’s when I knew the answer—I had to revamp my website to include….”

Your fourth email must explain the hidden benefits of the product or service you’re selling. At this point, the reader should be almost convinced, and this is your opportunity to close the deal. You might say, “Not convinced yet? Here’s what my new product can do for you if you try it.”

The fifth and final email is the call to action. Of course, you’ll include a call to action in each one of the emails, but in the last one, you can apply a bit of direct sales pressure and a direct appeal. Some people even decide to add a time limit: “I can only offer XYZ at this price for another few days, so take action today to claim yours!”

A lot of marketers use compelling images, videos, and an intriguing PS at the end of each email to increase the sequence’s effectiveness. While all SOS emails follow the same basic pattern, your creativity and passion can help turn yours into a success.

Conclusion

If you want to take your email marketing to a new level of success, then creating a soap opera sequence is one of the best ways to do it. As long as you have a dramatic and exciting story to tell, you can plan out a sequence that will boost your conversions and help your company to grow.

Thanks for reading,
Kamil Migas


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World’s Great Resources:
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8 Effective Email Marketing Strategies, Backed by Science
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10 Great Email Marketing Tools To Grow Your Business
3. How To Make Money Blogging
4. 4 Areas Of Email Marketing Improvement
5. 37 Tips for Writing Emails that Get Opened, Read, and Clicked


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